Full bio

Born in England, Simon Harsent studied photography at Watford Collage. After graduating, he assisted some of London’s top photographers before moving to Australia in 1988. While in Australia, Harsent quickly established himself as one of the countries most exciting young photographers. He worked on some of the country’s most awarded advertising campaigns, winning numerous national and international awards, including: Cannes Lions, One Show, Clio, D&AD, London International and Australia’s first Cannes Grand Prix. Simon has gone on to become one of the most awarded photographers in the world and his work has been featured in a host of magazines and books such as Archive, Campaign Brief, Creativity, Communication Arts, Capture, Graphis, Photo, the D&AD Art Direction book and Photo District News. Harsent’s work is also included in the permanent collection at the Queensland Art Gallery and The Powerhouse Museum. In 1997 Harsent moved to New York to further his career as a fine art and commercial photographer. In 2008 along with photographer Sean Izzard, Harsent co founded POOL a photographic collective based in Sydney. Currently dividing his time between New York and Sydney, Harsent continues to work on award-winning campaigns for some of the worlds top advertising agencies and designers whilst working on gallery projects such as his 2009 exhibition, Melt.

Artist Statement: This exhibition begins with images of the massive icebergs as they enter Greenland’s Disco Bay from the Ilulissat Icefjord. It ends with the icebergs off the East Coast of Newfoundland, by which time they have traveled hundreds of miles, and have been so battered and broken down that they are little more than ghosts of what they once were. Seeing them first overpowering in grandeur and then, later, about to be absorbed back into the flux from which they came, is both beautiful and humbling: a metamorphosis that endows them with a life-span, each with its own personality, each with it’s own story. This project began as a personal journey. It is impossible, however, to look at these images and not think of the environmental issues we face right now. Just as our personal choices define us, so the choices we make as a species will determine what becomes of the planet on which we live.

Press: Canon EOS - Photo5: Close up with Simon Harsent